It's all part of our service

This company is shifting its network from equipment owned by a telco to equipment the company owns itself -- which means changes can now be made without waiting for the telco guys to show up, says a pilot fish on the scene.

"At one of our remote sites, an order was put in to the telco to come on site and remove their equipment from our racks," says fish. "Since they own the equipment, they didn't want us to remove and box it up."

Because this is a remote site, there's no local IT person on site, so the telco tech is escorted to the server room by an employee. "You're not going to bring the network down, are you?" the employee jokes.

"No, I'm only removing equipment that's no longer in use," telco tech says.

When they get to the server room, the telco tech takes a quick look around and says, "Oh, this looks like it -- it only has one network wire, so this has to be it." He starts unplugging the equipment and removing it from the rack.

Apparently without noticing the big label that indicates it's not a telco router.

Or the fact that it's powered on and is showing network activity.

Or that there's clearly labeled telco equipment about 12 inches down on the rack, powered off and ready to be removed.

"After the employees came in screaming that the network was down, he decided to hook everything back up and got the network up again," fish says.

"Once everybody was working, he left. He never did take the telco's equipment with him. Guess he just wanted to come in and give the site a quick unscheduled outage.

"We're looking forward to him coming back to retrieve their equipment. Better luck next time, I guess."

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Copyright © 2010 IDG Communications, Inc.

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